Rocketry Planet

Sunday, October 14th, 2012
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size
Home / Archives / From The Archive
Articles & Documents from the Archives
August 1959 American Modeler features rocketry seminar
From The Archive by American Modeler   
Sunday, June 05, 2011
August 1959 American Modeler features rocketry seminar

"Dramatic proof of the wisdom behind an army directive authorizing service cooperative with model missileers in the series of one-a-month rocket 'seminars' held in New York and Washington with instructors from full-scale air-missile manufacturing firms and technical institutions. To test their theories and model 'birds' participants were invited to Army's Camp A.P. Hill near Bowling Green, Va., fir safety-supervised 'shoot.' Six foot 'Tycho-I' by Monroe-Woodbury Central Vally, N.Y., High School Rocket Society, reached 1 mile altitude. Capt. Brinley examines 3' high, 4" diameter model from Brooklyn," read the opening paragraph of the August, 1959 issue of American Modeler magazine article on amateur rocketry.

 
LIFE Magazine, April 7, 1958, showcases Alpha 1 rocket
From The Archive by LIFE Magazine   
Sunday, May 01, 2011
LIFE Magazine, April 7, 1958, showcases Alpha 1 rocket
"In its regular business, Experiment, Inc. of Richmond, Va. engages in serious research on U.S. missile programs. Now it has come out with a by-product that the missile age has made necessary, a toy rocket that satisfies juvenile scientists without imperiling them. Alpha 1 is a scientifically design...
 
LIFE Magazine, December 16, 1957, features amateur rockets
From The Archive by LIFE Magazine   
Friday, April 15, 2011
LIFE Magazine, December 16, 1957, features amateur rockets
"If U.S. educators now start to put added emphasis on science in the schools they should find an eager, built-in market for it. Last week U.S. youngsters seemed to be firing off rockets all over the place. In Minnesota a high school group sent one rocket about 1,700 feet into the air with a mouse as...
 
Z/S rockets featured in Scientific American, June 1957
From The Archive by Scientific American   
Monday, December 06, 2010
Z/S rockets featured in Scientific American, June 1957
"If during a weekend drive in the country, you should happen to see a thin trail of white smoke shoot 100 feet into the air, you will find an unusual group of scientific amateurs near the bottom of it. They will be equally proficient in handling explosive chemicals, differential equations, machine t...
 
Kuhn's Manta, from American Aircraft Modeler, May '69
From The Archive by Howard R. Kuhn, American Aircraft Modeler   
Thursday, November 18, 2010
Kuhn's Manta, from American Aircraft Modeler, May '69
"One of the most interesting experiences in Model Rocketry is flying the boost-glider. Since two conflicting sets of geometry apply, it is not a project designed for a first try at rocketry. During the boost or power phase the bird must act as a rocket while, immediately after burnout, it converts i...
 
Rocket Assembly Center, from Boys' Life, December '90
From The Archive by Mark Haverstock, Boys' Life   
Monday, May 31, 2010
Rocket Assembly Center, from Boys' Life, December '90
"Model rocket builders can always use an extra pair of hands when gluing and painting," wrote Mark Haverstock in the December 1990 issue of Boys' Life magazine. "Over the years, rocketry buffs have invented some slick tools to help them. The Rocket Assembly Center (RAC) combines them into one sm...
 
Stine's Wonderful Dirty Bird, American Modeler, Feb '62
From The Archive by G. Harry Stine, American Modeler   
Thursday, February 04, 2010
Stine's Wonderful Dirty Bird, American Modeler, Feb '62
"If you have the urge to get out and try model rocketry but don't have the time or inclination to spend several hours assembling a kit, what you need is a very simply model rocket that can be put together quickly, on that is reliable, and has good performance." This is the opening paragraph in A...
 
From the Archive: ARC's Nike Rocket Motor Fin booklet
From The Archive by U.S. Department of Defense   
Sunday, January 03, 2010
From the Archive: ARC's Nike Rocket Motor Fin booklet
"Atlantic Research has developed an assortment of fin assemblies for application with the NIKE M5, M5EI, or M66 rocket motors. The five different assemblies described in this booklet have been produced in quantity, fully ground tested and are flight proven. Each design features manually adjustable i...
 
Declassified: Performance Characteristics of the Little Joe
From The Archive by U.S. Department of Defense   
Sunday, October 25, 2009
Declassified: Performance Characteristics of the Little Joe
"A summary of performance data is given for the first five Project Mercury Little Joe flights. Some of these data are compared with calculated performance characteristics and are shown to be in good agreement. Curves showing calculated maximum performance characteristics for the Little Joe launch ve...
 
From the Archive: U.S. Army's Guide to Amateur Rocketry
From The Archive by U.S. Army Field Artillery School   
Sunday, June 28, 2009
From the Archive: U.S. Army's Guide to Amateur Rocketry
"The�tremendous�interest�in rocket development by high school and college students has been the source of much gratification to those who are most interesting in the future of rockets and guided missiles.� We foresee great benefit to our Nation as a consequence of this scientific curiosity on the pa...
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 Next > End >>
Results 1 - 10 of 34

Hot Topics

 

High Power Rocketry's Top 10 Biggest Regional Launches

I have a friend who has the goal of watching a baseball game in every big league stadium in America. He's been to Wrigley Field and Yankee Stadium, to Fenway Park and Chavez Ravine, and a dozen other parks scattered throughout the land. Every year he makes it to a new field, sometimes even two, and returns home with great memories—and enough hats and shirts—to last a lifetime.His most recent journey—to Progressive Field in Cleveland—got me thinking about high power rocketry's biggest venues and how this hobby has continued to grow in the last ten years. Some impressive traditions are alive and well out there at the biggest regional events in America.

 

Chasing the N record: Pursuing stratospheric dreams

Four years ago, James Dougherty didn't know the difference between a G80 and an M2500. A computer programmer from Northern California, Dougherty spent most of his time in Silicon Valley helping start-up companies and their customers with complex computer systems. In his spare time he liked to drive sports cars, have fun at the beach, or just hang out with his wife and daughter.Today, Dougherty is among a handful of hard core, high-power rocketry enthusiasts — in the United States and abroad — who are quickly moving toward a new altitude record for a commercial N motor. These fliers, taking advantage of technologic advancements in rocket motors and recovery systems — and their own hard work — believe they can clear 50,000 feet, or higher, on a single N. That's an altitude nearly two miles higher than commercial jetliners typically fly, and close to four miles higher than the peak of Mt. Everest. This is the realm of the stratosphere, where thunderstorms are born and the air density is nearly one-eighth that found at sea level.

 

One man's quest to honor America's Saturn V rocket

On April 25, 2009, history will be made.  At Higgs Farm in Price, Maryland, Steve Eves will enter the history books as the person who flew the largest scale model rocket in history. The rocket will weigh over 1,600 pounds, it will stand over 36 feet tall and it will be powered by a massive array of nine motors: eight 13,000ns N-Class motors and a 77,000ns P-Class motor. The estimated altitude of this single stage effort will be between 3,000 and 4,000 feet and the project will be recovered at apogee. In a special to Rocketry Planet, author Mark B. Canepa and ROCKETS Magazine wish to share Steve Eve's story with the readers here.

 

The Jarvis Illustrated Guide to Carbon Fiber Construction

Over the last few years, many people have asked Jim Jarvis of Austin, Texas, how he makes his carbon fiber rockets. So when he had an opportunity to make a new fin can, he decided to document the process in detail.The result of the build was the TooCarbYen Tutorial presented in this article. Actually, tutorial isn't a particularly accurate name for the build since it implies instruction on the proper way to do something. This article isn't about the best way to build carbon fiber rockets, it's about how Jim builds carbon fiber rockets, presented in enough detail to allow others to execute the process if they so choose.

Upcoming Events

ROSCO Sport Launch Orangeburg, SC
October 13 - 14, 2012
(Local Launch)
Rocketry of South Carolina sport launch Night launch Saturday possible

Oktoberfest, Tripoli Las Vegas, NV
October 19 - 21, 2012
(Regional Launch)
at Jean Dry Lake South of Las Vegas, NV. Located between mile marker 9 & 10 Las Vegas Blvd South....

View Full Calendar

Want Rocketry Books?

Buy Rocketry Books!
Now you can easily purchase hobby rocketry books online!

As Seen on Blogged.com

Rocketry Planet at Blogged

Users Currently Online

We have 37 guests online.